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  • Tags: Germany
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Addams gave this speech at a public meeting held by the Society for the Promotion of Industrial Education, at Cooper Union, along with Henry Pritchett, Frank Vanderlip, Frederick Fish, Nicholas Murray Butler, Frank P. Sargent, and others. Addams' appeal, unlike the other speakers, identified with the plight of working people and argued that industrial education would better their lives.
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An excerpt from Addams' March 22 speech at Faneuil Hall to the Boston Equal Suffrage Association and the Women's Trade Union League on the changes in women's work brought about by factory work.
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In this first installment of "Why Women Should Vote," Addams argues that antiquated notions of being a "lady" work against the woman suffrage movement.
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Salomon praises Twenty Years at Hull House and believes it will be useful to social workers in Germany.
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Lindemann praises Addam's book Twenty Years at Hull-House and apologizes for not being able to read it until recently. She continues by talking about her health
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Addams argues that international peace is not a failed idea, and even though World War I is in the early stages of fighting it is not too late to stop war from continuing.
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Catt explains the international issues that she has encountered in trying to organize an international peace meeting.
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Balch is deeply concerned that the peace movement might be caught flat-footed if the Germans sink an American ship or some other unexpected circumstance generates public outcry for war.
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Südekum tells Addams that either the German Chancellor or Secretary of the State will meet with her the next day.
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Montgelas informs Addams that Chancellor von Bethmann-Hollweg has agreed to meet her later that day.
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Selborne discusses the charges of rape made against the German army
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Letters written by a German soldier, published in Jus Suffragi, detail the moral dilemma faced by troops at the front.
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Addams discusses her visits to the heads of European countries in May and June 1915.
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Hohmeyer writes to Lochner about his observations and discussions with Germans from a recent trip to Denmark.
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Merkel sends Addams editorials (not found) regarding Germany's most recent diplomatic response to the sinking of the Lusitania .
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Schwimmer is concerned that she hasn't heard from Addams and gives her an account of their activities in Scandinavia and Germany.
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Berwald takes issue with the Tribune's stance that only true Americans have ancestors who spoke English. He also expresses his anti-war beliefs.
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Addams responds to Fisher's letter, eager to address the Bohemian National Alliance of America, but questioning his assumption that efforts to end the war should be seen as pro-German.
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Parsons is troubled over the growing sentiment towards war and asks Addams to speak to those in power.
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Wald writes Addams about efforts to communicate with Germany and Austria about charges against Alice Masaryk.
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Pringsheim explains to Addams her hopes for the Washington Peace Conference and involvement in war relief efforts.
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Addams asks House to arrange a meeting with President Wilson for Neena Pringsheim.
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Addams remarks that Germany's recent public peace offer is a step in the right direction.
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Addams remarks that Germany's recent public peace offer is a step in the right direction.
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Addams explains what the National Office of the Woman's Peace Party has been doing as the United States is on the brink of war.

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