39 results

  • Tags: Gender Roles
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Addams disagrees with Rebecca West's assertion that men are predisposed to menial tasks by nature.
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Addams tells a joke about the secret to happy marriages.
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Addams discusses the fear that if the Housemaid's union strikes, men will take their place permanently.
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Addams argues against Bicknell's claims that one of the top reasons that men desert their wives is due to poor cooking skills.
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In a speech in Chicago, Addams warns female students of their future after graduating from college.
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Kerr's editorial in the Cleveland News attacks Addams' for her views on peace, calling her naive.
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Norcross writes Addams a cryptic letter about war and the Woman's Peace Party.
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Hastings writes to Addams to express her feelings about the peace movement and Addams' work, citing her own experiences with the horrors of war as examples.
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Addams tells the story of two immigrant women's difficulties making enough to earn a living, their experiences with unions, and poverty.
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Scott's Committee on Observation on Limited Segregation reports to the Chicago Board of Education that educating boys and girls in the same manner does not appear to be the best policy, and requests time for continued study.
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A selection from Addams' book Democracy and Social Ethics, "Filial Relations" addresses ideas of women being able to live full lives and have thoughts outside of family life.
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Addams speaks about women college graduates and their role in public reform.
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Addams details the many reasons why it is important that women be given the right to vote, and of how the suffrage movement is not just found in Western nations, but globally.
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Addams endorses Harriet Vittum, who campaigned for the Board of Aldermans in the Seventeenth ward of Chicago.
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A newspaper report of Addams's speech to the Milwaukee branch of the Wisconsin Woman Suffrage Association, which  uses humor to render the male arguments against woman suffrage absurd. A version of this speech was later published in the Ladies' Home Journal.
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In a humorous effort to render the male arguments against woman suffrage absurd, Addams describes a hypothetical world in which women hold power and men are asking for the vote. This is the sixth article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and women's roles affecting change.
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In a humorous effort to render the male arguments against woman suffrage absurd, Addams describes a hypothetical world in which women hold power and men are asking for the vote.
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An excerpt from Addams' November 24 speech to the National Woman Suffrage Association meeting highlights her ideas about mother's pensions, immigrant socialization, and recreation.
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In a speech before the Chicago Women's Association. Addams complains that college women are disinclined toward philanthropy.
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Addams argues that strict gender roles for mothers and fathers are not useful.
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Bok's questions for a series of interviews with Jane Addams and other prominent women are intended to find an explanation for women's "unrest" and the factors that have led to their discontent.
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Addams gives arguments for woman's suffrage, stressing that working class need it to be able to control some aspects of their lives.
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In the final installment of "Why Women Should Vote," Addams highlights why women need the ballot and argues that woman suffrage is centuries overdue and necessary for women to protect themselves.
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Addams warns independent women against men who will try to take advantage of them in matters of money. This is a reprint of an article first published in 1907.