124 results

  • Subject is exactly "child labor"
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North wrote to Addams about Theodore Roosevelt's complaint that there was insufficient data on women and children's employment, and asks for her help with a plan.
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Writing on behalf of the National Child Labor Committee, Addams and others court financial support from public-spirited citizens in Chicago, Boston and Philadelphia.
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The text of a bill authorizing the Secretary of Commerce and Labor to investigate and report upon the industrial, social, moral, educational, and physical conditions of women and child workers in the United States.
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Addams' argues that child labor is the greatest social ill in remarks at the American Humane Association Convention on November 14, 1906. This version was published in December.
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Addams' speech before the National Child Labor Committee in Cincinnati calls for government regulations to protect women and children.
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Roosevelt informs Allison of the passage of a law to investigate and report on the conditions of working women and children in America.
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Addams expands on the cultural values taught in industrial education and training.
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In Addams' speech before the National Conference of Charities and Correction, she forcefully argues for child labor reform as well as increased education. The speech, given on May 10 in Richmond, VA, was published in the proceedings.
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Stewart complains of the poor state of education and asks Addams for a copy of her address to the National Educational Association.
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At the Sixth International Congress on Tuberculosis in Washington, D.C., Addams and Hamilton discuss "Economic Aspects of Tuberculosis" and why people living in poverty are more susceptible to the disease.
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Butler writes Addams about his desire to have Ben B. Lindsey speak in Milwaukee.
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Addams argues for the establishment of a federal bureau for the protection of children, especially regarding the issues of child labor and education. The speech was given before the Fifth National Child Labor Conference, held in Chicago.
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Addams discusses a previous study on newsboys and argues that there are no child labor laws that protect them. These comments were made at the National Child Labor Committee annual meeting in January 1909.
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Addams argues for the establishment of a federal bureau for the protection of children, especially regarding the issues of child labor and education. This is a published version of Addams's speech to the National Child Labor Committee meeting in January 1909.
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Bowen responds to Minnie Fiske's letter promoting child labor in the theater.
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Addams and Van der Vaart ask Blaine to be a part of the Illinois Child Labor Committee and attend at least one meeting.
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Addams invites Blaine to a meeting of the Illinois Child Labor Committee.
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Hatfield sends Addams a newspaper clipping and discusses the Child Labor Committee.
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Lindsey asks Addams to meet his friend Winifred Bonfils, who is expected to visit Chicago soon.
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Murphy writes Addams to tell her that her new book is an inspiration to him and shares some of his own ideas about children and the treatment of African Americans in the North and South.
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Letter welcoming people to join the American Association for Labor Legislation for a small fee.
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Addams lists authors of papers to be included in a book.
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Addams explains the difference between opposing child acting as an occupation and a vocation.
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Harper offers Addams his opinion on a bill regulating children in the street trades.
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Addams makes a reasoned argument against a bill in the Illinois State Senate that would make child actors exmept from the provision of the 1903 Illinois Child Labor Law.