159 results

  • Subject is exactly "Addams, Jane, views on peace"
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Addams requests a membership in the National Council for Arbitration and Peace.
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In this speech given at the Auditorium Theater, under the auspices of the Hamilton Club, Addams argues for a system of international arbitration to avoid war.
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Addams writes in support of Harbert's project, probably the effort to erect a colossal peace statue at the entrance of the Panama Canal, but informs her that she cannot devote much time to the effort.
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Newspaper report of Addams's speech before the Sunday Evening Club discussing new ideas about how to promote peace.
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In a humorous effort to render the male arguments against woman suffrage absurd, Addams describes a hypothetical world in which women hold power and men are asking for the vote.
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In a humorous effort to render the male arguments against woman suffrage absurd, Addams describes a hypothetical world in which women hold power and men are asking for the vote. This is the sixth article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and women's roles affecting change.
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Bok praises Addams' article on peace slated for the December issue of the Ladies' Home Journal.
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Addams advocates for world peace, arguing the advantages of international arbitration over war.
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Addams advocates for world peace, arguing the advantages of international arbitration over war. This is the final article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and a woman's role to affect change.
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Addams argues that international peace is not a failed idea, and even though World War I is in the early stages of fighting it is not too late to stop war from continuing.
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Passages taken from Addams book "Newer Ideas of Peace," in which she argues against war on the grounds that it is something that is beneath the ideas of modern man, something not to be admired, and a waste of time and energy.
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Addams argues that international peace is not a failed idea, and even though World War One is in the early stages of fighting it is not to late to stop war from continuing. Bryan also claims that peace is possible with mediation.
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Addams discusses plans for gathering a group of women peace activists to work on a resolution or proposal. (Enclosures not found.)
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Addams urges the belligerent nations at war to call a ceasefire in honor of Christmas.
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Addams gave this speech at the Woman's Constructive Peace Conference in Washington, D.C., on the reasons why women need to become more active in politics and the peace movement.
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Addams' secretary writes to Darnell thanking her for her interest in peace propaganda and for giving some suggestions.
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Addams' secretary is responding to Adams' letter and sending her copies of the Women's platform.
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Addams calls for the public to join the peace movement, demonstrate public sentiment for peace, and attend a conference.
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Addams urges for citizens of neutral nations to work actively for peace.
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Addams, Kellogg, and Wald argue the many reasons why World War One is destroying society, and detail how it is robbing a generation of its people and future. They also argue that the global community has the power to stop this war and prevent other wars.
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An excerpt from Addams' Children's Day speech at the Free Synagogue at Carnegie Hall.
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Addams discusses neutrality and why women were best suited to protest against war at Radcliffe College.
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Mayer asks Addams for advice on debate preparation for her high school.
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Addams argues the point that women need the right to vote in all national affairs to force the issue of peace, and to help prevent future wars from happening.
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Statement credited to Addams on her sailing for the International Congress of Women. This was published several months later after her return.