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  • Subject is exactly "Addams, Jane, and woman suffrage"
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Addams tells a story to illustrate the danger of looking at the struggle for women's rights through rose-colored glasses.
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Addams writes Thomas regarding her article about woman suffrage in the Ladies' Home Journal.
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In an interview with James Evan Crown, Addams discusses the impact that woman suffrage is having on society. Addams later denied having taken part in this interview, specifically her comments on the poor.
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Addams pays tribute to Theodore Parker at a Memorial Banquet in Chicago, where she praised his anti-slavery work and support of black suffrage, blamed his generation for not extending suffrage to women, and surmised that Parker would have ultimately supported the franchise for women had he lived longer.
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Sweet asks Addams to contribute some articles to her publishing company.
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Addams writes Stewart regarding her pledge to the Illinois Equal Suffrage Association.
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Addams' short argument for woman suffrage that women's voices are needed for the health and beauty of the cities.
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Addams gave this lecture at least two times; once at the February 2 meeting of the New York City Women's Political Union, and again on February 14 at the Boston School Voters' League. In the lecture, she discusses the philosophical relationship between women and the State and argues for the value of women in government, leading to the importance of woman suffrage. She may have also delivered a version of this lecture in Chicago on Dec. 8, 1910, to the Fortnightly Club.
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In this first installment of "Why Women Should Vote," Addams argues that antiquated notions of being a "lady" work against the woman suffrage movement.
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Not Started

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The second in a four-part series arguing for woman suffrage.
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In the final installment of "Why Women Should Vote," Addams highlights why women need the ballot and argues that woman suffrage is centuries overdue and necessary for women to protect themselves.
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Addams argues that woman suffrage is long overdue.
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Bliss thanks Addams for agreeing to provide a paper on woman suffrage for Sunday classes.
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An excerpt from Addams' address to the National American Woman Suffrage Association, on October 21, 1911, in Louisville, Kentucky, arguing that the desire for woman suffrage comes from women's desires for better social conditions.
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Addams writes Green expressing her delight to correspond with a man who had been in communication with the great leaders of the women's movement.
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Roosevelt compliments Addams's article in McClure's, which argues that woman's suffrage will lift up women from vice. But he also offers a caution that women's suffrage could fail to impart real change as suffrage failed to impart real change for African Americans in the South.
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Addams sends Haldeman her travel schedule in the hopes of seeing her while she is in New York.
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Addams writes Crane about a misunderstanding in regard to the leadership of the National American Woman Suffrage Convention in Louisville, Kentucky.
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Addams sends McCulloch materials in preparation for their trip to Milwaukee for a suffrage meeting.
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Addams declines Kent's request to speak at a suffrage meeting in Philadelphia.
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Addams writes James about plans for a suffrage meeting in Milwaukee.
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Addams sends McCulloch some letters and suggests a meeting to discuss plans for the convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association in Milwaukee.
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James writes Addams about activities of the suffrage movement in Wisconsin.
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The Chicago Tribune published an excerpted version of Addams' speech on woman suffrage in Madison, Wisconsin, on January 23, 1912.
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Addams connects woman suffrage with social work, arguing that women's voices are necessary for the improvement of social and labor conditions and that all -- social workers and housewives -- have a stake in making laws, which protect women, children, and families. Addams likely gave this speech on multiple occasions. This speech was also published in the Chicago Tribune on February 4, 1912.