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  • Subject is exactly "Addams, Jane, and labor movement"
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Addams' 1894 talk on the Pullman strike was only published in 1912 in the Survey. She analyzes the strike, drawing comparisons between George Pullman and his workers, and Shakespeare's King Lear and Cordelia.

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In 1894, Addams gave a speech to the Chicago Woman's Club and the Twentieth Century Club about the Pullman strike. The speech was not published until 18 years later, in the November 1912 Survey. In it, she draws comparisons between the key players in the strike, particularly George Pullman, and Shakespeare's dysfunctional royal family.
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Addams gave this speech at a public meeting held by the Society for the Promotion of Industrial Education, at Cooper Union, along with Henry Pritchett, Frank Vanderlip, Frederick Fish, Nicholas Murray Butler, Frank P. Sargent, and others. Addams' appeal, unlike the other speakers, identified with the plight of working people and argued that industrial education would better their lives.
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Addams spoke to the City Club about the unemployment crisis, explaining the role of Hull-House in providing space for public debate on the issue.
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The Inter Ocean summarizes Addams' lecture on rising corruption in trade union leadership.
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Addams addressed a meeting of teachers and laborers on the need for funds to support better education on February 11; the lecture was published on March 5, 1905.
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Excerpts from Addams' speech discussing conditions for individual women workers who seek to improve wages and working conditions.
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At the inaugural conference of the Women's Trade Union League, held at the Berkeley Lyceum in New York, Addams argues that women workers should unionize to improve working conditions.
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Post informs Addams that the newspaper coverage of the Women's Trade Union League's decision to move their meetings from Bowen Hall at Hull-House to the Chicago Federation of Labor Hall was inaccurate and designed to cause hard feelings.
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Addams discusses the evil effects of child labor on labor practices and education.
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Addams offers comments on Roger Baldwin's statement regarding the Industrial Workers of the World Defense Committee.
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Newspaper account of Addams's comments after all-night efforts to settle a teamsters' strike ended in failure. These quotes are part of a larger news article on the negotiations.
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Addams argues for the implementation of a minimum wage for female workers.
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On behalf of the U.S. Secretary of Labor, Malone invites Addams to serve on the Committee on Organization of the Congress on Social Insurance.
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Addams discusses the role that education plays in the life of the workingman. This article is an excerpt from Democracy and Social Ethics.
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Devine thanks Addams for her letter and promises to do what he can to secure Kelley's nomination as NY Labor Commissioner.
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Addams provides an overview of the activities of the Hull-House Labor Museum, complete with illustrations of weaving. The sixteen-page report discusses the weaving and cloth-making techniques of various immigrants who live in the Hull-House neighborhood.
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Midwood is studying in Amherst College and is interested in philanthropy.
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Addams introduces the Chicago Industrial Exhibit's goals and content for publication in its Handbook.
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Osgood asks Addams to write an article for the Survey laying out the problem of different labor legislation standards from state to state.
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Osgood invites Addams to speak at the Chicago meeting of the American Association of Labor Legislation and asks for a meeting beforehand.
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Osgood writes Addams about a legislative opportunity in Illinois for the Chicago branch of the American Association for Labor Legislation.
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Addams et al. ask Washington to join the American Association for Labor Legislation campaign.
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The American Association for Labor Legislation prepared this form letter to gather support in Illinois for limiting work for women to 60 hours per week.
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Addams and a number of other leaders petition President Taft to open a commision to study the conditions of labor, its relation to the government, the cost of strikes, and trade unions.