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  • Subject is exactly "Addams, Jane, and labor movement"
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Andrews send Addams his suggestions for revising her speech for publication.
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Addams agrees with Crowe that Chicago firemen deserve pay increases and invites her to speak to the Hull-House Women's Club.
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Addams telegrams Baldwin that she cannot join a committee to raise funds for miners in West Virginia.
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Addams accuses the editor of the Chicago Tribune of unfair coverage of her address, and explains her position on political deportations.
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Addams accuses the editor of the Chicago Tribune of unfair coverage of her address, and explains her position on political deportations.
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Addams reluctantly declines to sign on to Baldwin's appeal for funds to defend Industrial Workers of the World workers arrested by the government.
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Addams offers comments on Roger Baldwin's statement regarding the Industrial Workers of the World Defense Committee.
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Addams tells Baldwin that there is not enough evidence with regard to the Industrial Workers of the World Defense Committee for her to contact the President.
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Addams argues for protection of migrant laborers and food supplies, and discusses the different outlook that the working class has towards war.
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Addams argues for the protection of migrant laborers and food supplies, and discusses the different outlook that the working class has towards war. The speech was prepared for the National Conference on Foreign Relations of the United States.
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Addams argues for the protection of migrant laborers and food supplies and discusses the different outlook that the working class have towards war. The speech was prepared for the National Conference on Foreign Relations of the United States.
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Addams drafts her arguments for the protection of migrant laborers, food supplies, and discusses the different outlook that the working class have towards war. The speech was prepared for the National Conference on Foreign Relations of the United States.
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Hillman thanks Addams for her support of the clothing workers of Chicago, and goes on to detail their struggle.
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Addams spoke to the City Club about the unemployment crisis, explaining the role of Hull-House in providing space for public debate on the issue.
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On behalf of the U.S. Secretary of Labor, Malone invites Addams to serve on the Committee on Organization of the Congress on Social Insurance.
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Addams explains the evils of unpaid prison labor. This is the fourth article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and a woman's role to affect change.
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Addams argues for a minimum wage for female workers. This is the third article of a monthly, year-long series on economic and social reform in America and women's role in affecting change.
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Addams likens prison labor camps to slavery and discusses how unpaid prison labor impacts the families of the inmates.
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Addams et al. ask Washington to join the American Association for Labor Legislation campaign.
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Andrews asks Addams, as a member of the Committee on Unemployment, to assist with a report for the American Association for Labor Legislation.
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In 1894, Addams gave a speech to the Chicago Woman's Club and the Twentieth Century Club about the Pullman strike. The speech was not published until 18 years later, in the November 1912 Survey. In it, she draws comparisons between the key players in the strike, particularly George Pullman, and Shakespeare's dysfunctional royal family.
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Addams' 1894 talk on the Pullman strike was only published in 1912 in the Survey. She analyzes the strike, drawing comparisons between George Pullman and his workers, and Shakespeare's King Lear and Cordelia.

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Addams describes her experiences at the Progressive Party Convention, discussing how items were added to its platform, particularly labor and military planks, and its appeal to labor and women.
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Addams discusses working conditions for women and advocates for a minimum wage for female workers.