80 results

  • Subject is exactly "Addams, Jane, and labor movement"
REEL 46_1526.jpg

Addams was one of six people who commented on John R. Commons' paper at the American Sociological Society meeting in Madison, Wisconsin, in December 1907. Addams' comments were published in the proceedings.
REEL0005_0322.jpg

Post informs Addams that the newspaper coverage of the Women's Trade Union League's decision to move their meetings from Bowen Hall at Hull-House to the Chicago Federation of Labor Hall was inaccurate and designed to cause hard feelings.
REEL0005_0335.jpg

Addams discusses with Commons her plans to start a League for labor legislation in Chicago and requests a visit with him and Richard T. Ely.
REEL0005_0356.jpg

Ely expresses enthusiasm for Addams' proposal to start a local chapter of the American Association for Labor Legislation and suggests people who can help.
REEL0005_0361.jpg

Addams updates Ely on the efforts to form a Chicago branch of the American Association for Labor Legislation.
REEL 46_1670.jpg

Addams gives arguments for woman's suffrage, stressing that working class need it to be able to control some aspects of their lives.
REEL0005_0578.jpg

Osgood writes Addams about a legislative opportunity in Illinois for the Chicago branch of the American Association for Labor Legislation.
REEL0005_0584.jpg

Addams sends a copy of the invitations for the meeting of the American Association of Labor Legislation to Osgood.
REEL0005_0590.jpg

Osgood invites Addams to speak at the Chicago meeting of the American Association of Labor Legislation and asks for a meeting beforehand.
REEL0005_0591.jpg

Addams writes Osgood about the importance of John Commons' attendance at the American Association for Labor Legislation meeting.
REEL0005_0597.jpg

Addams asks Osgood to send receipts for reimbursement to her and John Commons for their visit to Chicago to help establish a branch of the American Association for Labor Legislation.
REEL 46_1739.jpg

Addams compares the United States' treatment of women and children in labor to the ways of European countries. This speech was given at public meeting associated with the Conference on the Care of Dependent Children, in Washington, D.C. on January 25, 1909.
REEL0005_0834.jpg

Osgood asks Addams to write an article for the Survey laying out the problem of different labor legislation standards from state to state.
REEL0005_0891.jpg

Addams writes Andrews about a letter he sent her.
REEL0005_0892.jpg

The American Association for Labor Legislation prepared this form letter to gather support in Illinois for limiting work for women to 60 hours per week.
REEL0006_0722.jpg

Addams and a number of other leaders petition President Taft to open a commision to study the conditions of labor, its relation to the government, the cost of strikes, and trade unions.
JAPA-0472.jpg

Newspaper report of an Addams' statement about the causes of violent labor actions being antiquated laws.
REEL 47_0404.jpg

Addams' remarks at the January 13 City Club's Housewarming meeting on Labor called for bettering relations between labor unions and the City Club.
Chicago_Tribune_Sat__Jan_27__1912_(2).jpg

A newspaper report of Addams's speech to the Milwaukee branch of the Wisconsin Woman Suffrage Association, which  uses humor to render the male arguments against woman suffrage absurd. A version of this speech was later published in the Ladies' Home Journal.
REEL0006_0807.jpg

Addams sends her regrets to Andrews that she cannot become a contributing member to the American Association for Labor Legislation.
REEL0006_1173.jpg

Addams sends Robins a copy of her suggestions (not found) for Alexander McCormick.
REEL 47_0436.jpg

Addams lays out the Progressive Party's pledge to working women--the prohibition of night work, the institution of the eight-hour day, and a minimum wage in sweated industry. This is one of a series of articles she prepared for the Central Press Association for the Progressive Party campaign in 1912.
REEL 47_0441.jpg

Addams described the Progressive Party's support for the dependents of prisoners, by allowing wages they earn in prison to be sent to their families. It also supports calls for social insurance that would protect the poor in case of injury or old age. This is one of a series of articles prepared for the Central Press Association as part of the Progressive Party campaign in 1912.
REEL 47_0453.jpg

Addams describes the Progressive Party's pledge to support new immigrants by creating protection for industrial laborers. This is one of a series of articles she prepared for the Central Press Association as part of the Progressive Party campaign in 1912.
REEL 47_0507.jpg

Addams offers a biographical justification of why she has entered politics and joined the Progressive Party. The article was published in October 1912.