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  • Tags: Woman Suffrage
  • Item Type: Text
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Thomas apologizes for the delay in responding and discusses the impact of Addams' lectures on the suffrage cause.
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Addams points out the hypocrisy in women who ridicule suffragists.
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Burritt writes Addams for advice about drawing a connection between immigrant women and the suffrage movement and compliments her onĀ Newer Ideals of Peace.
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Addams declines to sign a letter McCulloch sent her because it fails to strike the right tone. This letter is likely related to a statement McCulloch released on December 6 about Theodore Roosevelt's support for women's suffrage.
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Thomas asks Addams to reconsider participating in the Equal Suffrage Council of College Women meeting to be held in Buffalo, New York.
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Tarbell writes Addams about her life since her visit to Hull-House.
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Addams forwards to McCulloch a letter with questions about suffrage and protective legislation.
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Addams invites Thomas to speak about suffrage as part of a second push to secure municipal voting rights for women in Chicago.
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Addams asks Whitlock to visit Hull-House and make a speech to a woman's suffrage group while in Chicago.
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Whitlock declines Addams' request to lecture before a suffrage committee, but he accepts her offer to visit Hull-House.
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Addams asks Booth to thank Anita McCormick Blaine for her donation to the the Committee for the Extension of Municipal Suffrage for Chicago Women.
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Nicholes invites Whitlock and his wife to a suffrage meeting and to stay at Hull-House when he is in Chicago.
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Ella Stewart sends Whitlock a check to cover his expenses for traveling to Chicago to speak with suffragists.
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Addams argues that when women vote, they help to improve protection for children and to the general public.
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Addams sends Haldeman a postcard regarding the suffrage movement.
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In terms of securing their rights, Addams argues that women in America lag behind their European counterparts.
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Addams discusses the movement for municipal suffrage for women in Chicago, arguing that it will help improve schools, public health, and sanitation.
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Addams argues women's need for the vote so that they can  perform their duties to family and the nation.
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A portion of Addams' speech from the Second Annual Peace Conference on May 4, 1909 about what women have done that have earned them suffrage.
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Addams argues that American women are behind their European peers with regard to individual rights.
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Bok congratulates Addams on her suffrage articles for the Ladies Home Journal.
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Addams apologizes for holding on to Andrews' article too long and praises him for its views on suffrage and protective legislation.
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Addams argues for women to have the vote in order that they may continue to perform their duties to family and to home in the modern world, where responsibilities, like feeding their children and keeping them safe, are no long directly within their control.
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Addams tells a story to illustrate the danger of looking at the struggle for women's rights through rose-colored glasses.
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Bacon praises Addams' book The Spirit of Youth and the City Streets and writes about the progressive activities in which the women of her town are engaged.

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